Water Dispute

Water Dispute

Basically, Georgia says that when the lines were drawn, they messed up 200 years ago. They want the lines redrawn to where Georgia would have on shore of the Tennessee river. Tennessee says no.

My feeling is this:The border may have been misplaced, but after this long, I believe the term “fait accompli” would be useful here. After the border has been in place for so long, it is useless to continue argument. The border is where it is. If it had changed, say 75 years ago, when there was not so much on the waterline, no problem. However, if the border moves now, then countless businesses and homes would have to re-register with Georgia.

I await opinions.

13 Responses to “Water Dispute”

  1. Danny Says:

    I agree completely. If they wanted the borders corrected just for the sake of accuracy, they should’ve done it long ago. Now they just want the water.

  2. Brad B. Says:

    The burden of proof obviously lies with Georgia; On “prima facie” alone, I agree with you. However, barring a statue of limitations, it’s likely court proceedings will take place. Frankly, I don’t see why Georgia shouldn’t have it’s day in court – assuming what they claim is true.

  3. Doug McCaughan Says:

    I think Georgia doesn’t have a water shortage problem as much as a water management and land management problem. Therefore, giving them more water is not going to solve the problem. Giving them the Tennessee River will only cause problems for TN and those river dependent cities downstream. Additionally, moving the TN southern border to the parallel puts part of Memphis in Mississippi causing political, economic, and a wealth of other problems that are far outweigh Georgia’s water problem. Georgia has other solutions to their water problem. This is simply a political stunt to draw attention to their crisis, a crisis which will only be resolved through better water and land management over a long period of time.

    Georgia’s plight needs to be a warning to other states. Tennessee could follow in Georgia’s footsteps if it does not take precautions to curb development and misuse of its lands.

  4. Kari Says:

    Water is money, and it looks like Georgia is willing to take this all the way to the Supreme Court to “recover” what they have lost. If only that energy was used to reduce the demand for the water in the first place. Actually looking at the real problem instead of this distraction of smoke and mirrors. It’s a quick fix to a problem seen throughout our country. Do people in Georgia believe that if only they just had a little more water than everything would be okay? Where does it end? Once people begin to realize that THEY are the solution, we might start to see some movement in the right direction. I guess I see it as something larger than a court decision… ownership does not fix exhausted natural resources.

  5. Erin Says:

    I think it’s ludicrous. Consider the financial implications for both states should the border be moved. And the post office! What would they do? Those poor folks are already on the edge as it is!

  6. paula Says:

    A ridiculous proposal at best. You can not at this point start changing states borders to suit the needs of a few.

  7. Randell Says:

    I live in GA just a couple of hours south of TN in one of the largest areas of growth in the state. I drive through the neighborhoods every day during the summer season and it’s apparent where all of our water is going. It’s going to water lawns and flowerbeds to keep them pretty. We have seen a huge increase in the new construction of residential homes over the last decade with no increase in the water supply reserve. The state says that during the summer months, I can’t water my lawn or flower bed, wash my car, or do any outdoor watering at all. Meanwhile, the builder can keep his sprinklers running 24/7 if necessary because it’s essential to sell the house… huh? Now that the housing market has slowed, there are so many new homes sitting empty that are waiting to be purchased but until they are guess what… sprinklers on all day!

    Don’t be fooled, we have enough water. The people of GA don’t need to make a run to grab the Tennessee River, we need to make a run to the state house and whip up on the legislators who continue to allow us to be in this situation in the first place.

    Kari said it, “water is money”. We just overspend our water as much as we overspend our money.

  8. Tom Sparks Says:

    Tommy, as we move on into the Twenty First Century, water access is going to become a bigger and bigger issue. In many parts of the world, including some parts of the US, water sources are being privatized and water is being turned into a commodity, like pork bellies.

    Georgia is behaving badly, if they win in court Georgia will create a negative backlash and they will suffer. Have you heard of the Hatfield’s and the McCoys? I hope Georgia can use that famous “American Ingenuity” to find creative solutions to their problems, they don’t need to steal from their neighbors.

  9. alice Says:

    Adverse possession: the open and exclusive occupation and use of someone else’s real property without permission of the owner continuously for a period of years prescribed by law, thereafter giving title to the occupier-user.

    The bottom line is that Georgia no longer has any claim to land between the intended border and the current border. Tennessee has occupied the land continuously for the past 200 years.

  10. Mom Says:

    Moving the border would be an economic and logistical nightmare for everyone. Tennesseans see this as a water management problem of Georgia’s. The Atlanta area’s beautiful landscaping and multitudes of shiny pools just aren’t going to make us willing to hand over natural resources. Unfortunately, water isn’t just money. Water is also life. Without CLEAN water, people, animals and plants will die. If Georgia spends all their time fighting Tennessee instead of building desalination plants, this will be about the working poor in Georgia. They won’t be able to buy cases of bottled water from the stores when their faucets run dry. I know we won’t be glib if it gets to that, but is Georgia going to allow that to happen just to win this fight?

  11. Tamara Says:

    I agree with your dad and others who cite a water management problem in Georgia.

    As someone who used to live in Southern California, I’m perfectly aware of just how far some states have to pipe water from an adjacent source. Southern California pipes a good amount from Lake Havasu in Arizona. Georgia borders the Atlantic Ocean, for goodness sake! Just remove the salt!

    (Oh…and another problem is the rate structure used by many water utility companies. Often, the rate per gallon is actually LOWER the more gallons a customer uses! How does that motivate customers to conserve?!)

  12. R. Neal Says:

    As previous commenters have noted, Georgia created their own problem by not managing growth, especially around the Atlanta area.

    Ridiculous proposals such as moving the borders to snare another state’s water aren’t the solution. The solution is to manage growth so that the available resources can sustain the area’s population.

    This will become even more important as resources such as oil, water, farmland and topsoil, and even clean air become increasingly scarce.

    Water shortages are just a preview. When the oil starts running out, America will have to rethink our entire economy, our transportation systems, our farming and food distribution systems, our communities and neighborhoods and lots more. And it will be a worldwide problem. Imagine the Georgia v. Tennessee border dispute on a global scale, with billions of people in developing nations such as China competing with the rest of the world for natural resources.

    Sadly, past generations including mine have ignored the problems, leaving it for your generation to solve. I am optimistic, though, that your generation will be smart enough, out of awareness if not necessity, to figure it out.

  13. R. Neal Says:

    As previous commenters have noted, Georgia created their own problem by not managing growth, especially around the Atlanta area.

    Ridiculous proposals such as moving the borders to snare another state’s water aren’t the solution. The solution is to manage growth so that the available resources can sustain the area’s population.

    This will become even more important as resources such as oil, water, farmland and topsoil, and even clean air become increasingly scarce.

    Water shortages are just a preview. When the oil starts running out, America will have to rethink our entire economy, our transportation systems, our farming and food distribution systems, and lots more. And it will be a worldwide problem. Imagine the Georgia v. Tennesse border dispute on a global scale, with billions of people in developing nations such as China competing with the rest of the world for natural resources.

    Sadly, past generations including mine have ignored the problems, leaving it for your generation to solve. I am optimistic, though, that your generation will be smart enough, out of awareness if not necessity, to figure it out.

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