Tellico

http://www.knoxnews.com/news/2008/apr/13/tellico-dam-still-generating-debate/

More on the Tellico Dam debate…Says who despite the arguments about the Snail darter, the fish has thrived in the reservoir. However, it still cost a lot of people their farmland. TVA says it generates power, but all it does is redirect water towards Fort Loudon. A yacht maker says that people can reach 24 states by that water.

I feel that the dam is ok having been made, although I am not SURE about it.

What do you think?

3 Responses to “Tellico”

  1. R. Neal Says:

    You are smart to not be sure about it. There were a lot of issues involved. Taking of people’s property and farmland, as you mentioned was one. The economic benefits (that some say have never materialized) were another. The flooding of ancient and historical American Indian gathering places and sacred burial grounds was yet another.

    Back in the 1930s, the Tennessee Valley Authority set out to “tame” the Tennessee River. The intent was to control flooding and generate power for a poverty stricken region. (Look up “rural electrification.”)

    It was a generally believed to be a huge success at the time, credited with helping bring the region into the 20th century and put lots of people to work during depressed economic times.

    But some believe TVA didn’t know when to quit.

    Today, the farmland would probably be more valuable than the small amount of power generated by diverting water from the Little Tennessee River into the turbines at Fort Loudon Dam.

    And while hydro-electric power is one of the cleanest ways to generate power, there are only so many rivers we can dam. At some point we should consider the value of a free-flowing river from a recreational, historic, and natural habitat point of view.

    (Although by that point Tellico Dam was built the Little T already had a series of dams, some built to power the Alcoa Aluminum factories.)

  2. mickey Says:

    I agree with R. Neal, especially his point about the value of free flowing rivers. I can appreciate the relatively clean energy production a dam provides, but at what cost? Not a fan of the dams.

  3. tommy Says:

    R. Neal -
    Yes, the dam is a bad return. Not much gain, and huge loss.

    Mickey -
    Neither am I.

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